Accounting Constraints

Accounting Constraints and Modifying Principles

Accounting constraints sometimes referred to as modifying principles, are used to modify accounting assumptions and accounting concepts to make accounting information in financial statements more useful for users.

What are the Accounting Constraints?

The following are the main accounting constraints to consider when preparing financial statements:

  1. Materiality Accounting Constraint
  2. The full disclosure accounting concept requires that all information significant to the user of the financial statements should be disclosed. This accounting constraint allows unimportant and immaterial information to be left out or merged with other financial information.

  3. Prudence Accounting Constraint
  4. The prudence or conservatism accounting constraint dictates that all potential losses are taken into the financial statements, but all potential profits are left out.

  5. Cost Benefit Accounting Constraint
  6. The cost of applying an accounting concept should not be more than the benefit derived from it. If the cost is more than the benefit then that concept should be modified.

  7. Consistency Accounting Constraint
  8. The accounting assumptions and concepts used in the preparation of financial statements should be applied consistently from year to year. This allows meaningful comparisons to be made by users.

Accounting Constraints and Accounting Principles

Accounting constraints are one part of a framework established by an agreed set of accounting principles, as illustrated in the diagram below:

accounting principles v 1.0
Accounting Principles Preview

The accounting principles diagram is available for download in PDF format by following the link below.

Last modified November 6th, 2016 by Team

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